Wearable World hackathon Round 1 Recap

With the upcoming Thanksgiving, we’re to witness once again one the busiest times of the year. Most airports will see increased traffic as travelers fly in and out of countries/cities.

The San Francisco International Airport, according to its facts page, has enplaned/deplaned roughly 45M passengers last 2013. It is also one of the few airports in the world that offer an API. It is through their API that they form a dialogue with developers – to help make SFO an enjoyable segment of travel for the 45M passing through.

To help achieve this goal, they partnered with Wearable World to run a series of developer challenges aimed at helping improve the overall airport experience from start to end. The recent installment of this challenge is a 2-part event, with Round 1 concluding just last November 18th at Say Media here in San Francisco. Just like the first installment of the WearableWorld developer challenge series, we were privelged to have had the opportunity to demonstrate the Concur API to developers, and work with them to craft ideas and solutions that serve the business traveler.

The event was kicked off by none other than Robert Scoble, blogger and author of Age of Context.

Each of the API partners then had a few minutes each to explain how developers can use their API towards the goal of the “Connected Airport”. That was followed shortly by a hearty lunch, then it was coding time!

The next day, we were back Say Media to help developers with their apps, and make sure they get submitted before 3pm to ChallengePost..

That was followed shortly by demos by the participants, who were given a few minutes to demonstrate their work in front of the judges. Judges were from WearableWorld, The San Francisco International Airport, American Airlines, Mastercard, Next-Gen Computing Wearables, and the San Francisco Mayor’s Office. Here’s a demo by ShuttleBeacon, that ended up winning the grand prize at the event! Their app helps passengers arriving at the airport to identify/encourage additional travel options, especially ones that use the existing public transport infrastructure, to get them to their destination. They’re using the Concur API to pull flight information (airport and departure/arrival times) to prepopulate items needed by the app.

You can check out all the other 5 teams that used/demonstrated a Concur API integration in our Twitter feed.

Overall, we had a blast at the WearableWorld event! Congratulations to the Wearable World team and the San Francisco International Airport Communications and Marketing team for putting together the hackathon, and getting Concur involved! And of course to ShuttleBeacon, for winning Round 1 of this event. We’ll see you again in Round 2!

How to use / access the Gmail API from C# Windows 8

Download the code here – https://github.com/ismaelc/GmailAPI-Windows8-OAuth

This Windows 8 (C#/XAML) code demonstrates:

Getting an access token for the Gmail API using OAuth 2.0
Calling Gmail API (Get messages IDs)

Using the code:

This C#/XAML sample code is a modified version of another LinkedIn OAuth sample code. It’s re-targeted for Windows 8.1 using Microsoft Visual Studio Express 2013 for Windows.

To use this code, you need to set up your Gmail API credentials from the Google Developer Console. Check out these instructions on how to set up your account, and get your Client ID and Client Secret keys – https://github.com/ismaelc/GmailAPI-Windows8-OAuth